A Geek in Japan: Discovering the Land of Manga, Anime, Zen, and the Tea Ceremony

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Keiretsu : groups of companies that work together, trying not to compete with one another and cooperating in order to make more money together. Meishi : business cards, but in Japan they are an extremely important element when starting a conversation with a stranger, a client, or another company. Because the meishi is so significant, you must treat it with the utmost care, as if it were part of the other person.

A Geek in Japan: Discovering the Land of Manga, Anime, Zen, and the Tea Ceremony

Nemawashi : an essential concept for understanding the Japanese business world. To some extent, you could see nemawashi as a sort of democracy taken to the extreme. Thanks to this, Japanese companies seldom make mistakes and are always taking steps forward and improving ceaselessly, if slowly. Suppose you have the brilliant idea of eliminating a redundant chip from one of the company products. Before making your proposal, you must make sure that all the employees around you agree. The Sony employee will consult all his department coworkers, and, once he has made sure his proposal is accepted by everyone, he will talk with his kakaricho immediate superior.

His superior will then do a nemawashi among the other department heads, and once they have agreed, the process will continue until the idea reaches the highest spheres at Sony. Notice how, if the nemawashi process fails somewhere along the line because someone is totally against it, the idea never flows toward the top of the pyramid. Once the nemawashi process has been completed, the department that initiated it can make a formal proposal in a meeting, where it will obviously be accepted. The Japanese avoid direct confrontation above all. Making changes in Japan is difficult.

Everything is slow, there is a lot of paperwork, everybody must agree, and there are tons of meetings. But when things are done, they usually work to perfection—everything goes well. The same expression would be used the other way around, if our boss gave us a present. Sometimes it happens that someone is too ambitious and flaunts his power too much, and he ends up being ostracized by his company and society.

There are books about cases where a person of great promise has ended up cleaning the company bathrooms because he was too ambitious and his superiors got scared: the Japanese see ambition as a threat to the inner balance of the system, which might bring them down in the future. Thus, if you drink a beer, you are drinking sake; if you drink whiskey, you are drinking sake; and if you drink rum, you are drinking sake. Today the hanami tradition involves sitting under a sakura tree with your family, your friends, or the people at your company.

The manji : an ancient Buddhist symbol full of spiritual meaning. Resembles a swastikas, which shocks many tourists. Jinja : Shinto shrines The easiest way to identify a jinja is to look at the entrance. You will almost always find a large red wooden gate marking the entrance to sacred ground. In contrast, at the entrance to a Buddhist o-tera, there is usually a smaller dark-colored gate and walls separating the temple grounds from the outside.

Ukiyo-e : print-making art was developed during the Edo Period — Thanks to the ease with which ukiyo-e copies could be made, they arrived in the West and influenced painters of the time, such as Vincent Van Gogh and Claude Monet. May constitute one of the earliest pornographic markets in history. Moreover, only the best shoots are hand-picked for the matcha production, and unlike in other teas, they are ground to an extremely flne powder.

It is very rich in amino acids and antioxidants. Zen koan : brief stories in the form of riddles or fables that Zen teachers use to teach lessons to their students. Blood groups In Japan, people ask what your blood group is in the most unexpected situations. Laughter Covering your teeth with your hand is seen as a sign of good manners in Japanese women.

Shamelessly showing the inside of your mouth when you laugh can be seen as a sign of bad manners. For future someday! Apr 18, Jordan Debben rated it it was amazing.

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For instance, kabuki theater appeared as a consequence of the need to entertain an increasingly flourishing society with more and more free time. In the top left corner there is a picture of the Statue Of Liberty. This confused me at fi p This confused me at first. Turns out Japan just decided they wanted one too.

They also have a copy of the Eiffel Tower. Talk about cultural appropriation :P I found the chapter on Japanese business the most interesting, probably because it was the topic I knew the least about. I also learned allot about Confucianism for similar reasons, it's one of the few eastern philosophies I haven't studied yet, and I will add a few books on the topic to my reading list. It sounds fascinating, sort of like Plato's Republic which I have managed to read allot about without having actually read. That's on my list too except that it actually works.

It's a heavily collectivist ideology, and not something I would want to live in. In fact I would probably feel the need to rebel against it, just as I feel the need to rebel against collectivism in my own culture, and we can see some of the disadvantages to collectivism, as well as the advantages, in Japanese culture, which I have always had a great deal of respect for and still do. I'm envious of Japans low crime rate, and almost non existent terrorism Japan has a very strict immigration policy , but I also don't want to be forced into a system of mass conformity, where argument from authority is not considered a logical fallacy.

Sometimes you can't have your cake and eat it. I do think there are some aspects of Japanese culture we can and should culturally appropriate, just as they have culturally appropriated many of the best aspects of western culture and integrated them. Jun 23, Sam Still Reading rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: people wishing to know more about Japan. Recommended to Sam Still Reading by: saw it on the bookshop shelf.

A Geek in Japan is one of those books I saw on the shelf at my local bookstore and just had to have. I love Japan and I love to learn more about it.

taylor.evolt.org/cunun-solteros-catolicos-albudeite.php A Geek in Japan is deceiving though, in that it contains much more information than you think at first glance. Hector Garcia has obviously put a lot of time and effort into researching this book, which delves into many aspects of Japan. It includes history, social structures I learned more from this book than I did from six years of Japanese , cult A Geek in Japan is one of those books I saw on the shelf at my local bookstore and just had to have.

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It includes history, social structures I learned more from this book than I did from six years of Japanese , culture, work life, leisure, anime, cosplay, vending machines, zen, Shinto, Buddhism, temples, shrines and walking tours of various places in Tokyo. What I found very interesting was that according to Hector, the Japanese wish for harmony as a whole over triumph of the individual — which is very different to what occurs in the West.

It was also interesting to see repetition given as a way of learning — if you do something hundreds of times, you will end up getting it right. The work structures were also very interesting — the consultation between many levels with the focus on precision. This is a small thing to get used to. I learnt so much from this book, more than I did over a long period of study and a long trip to Japan. It clarified a lot of things for me.

Well done on a great book — this would certainly be of use to those going to Japan or just wanting to know more about it. The pictures are excellent too. Jan 05, Jason Keenan rated it really liked it Shelves: japan. The book is a fun read and may even surprise readers familiar with Japan with a few new explanations of culture and history. Don't let the title fool you -- A Geek in Japan really offers up a whole lot of quick highlights of what makes up life in Japan. It touches on broad topics like tradi A Geek in Japan: Discovering the Land of Manga, Anime, Zen, and the Tea Ceremony is such a great introduction to Japanese culture — and the modern cool Japan we are coming to know as well as the historic Japan.

It touches on broad topics like traditional culture, the Japanese character, and daily life.


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All in all it's a wonderful introduction to what makes Japan unique. The book also has a wonderful informal tone — which can help anyone planning a trip to map out their plans in a fun way. Jan 10, Niki Ganong rated it really liked it. A Geek in Japan is a great, cursory cultural guide to the country.

It's not going to be of any use to a traveler, but it is interesting.

JAPANESE CHRISTMAS PEPSI • WHAT FLAVOR IS IT?!

May 24, Matimate rated it really liked it Shelves: nonfiction , Comprehensive text of what to do or not to do in Japanese society for confused foreigner.

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